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Friday, April 25, 2014

Casino manager Blyth to cooperate in probe, pay $15K

Under a deal with the U.S. government, Tinian Dynasty casino general manager Tim Blyth agreed to cooperate with the federal investigation and testify at any trials or hearings.

At the same time, Blyth will be made to pay at least $15,000 to be applied toward any civil monetary penalty imposed by the U.S. government.

He will also be barred from working in a financial institution in the United States, to be effective 30 days after the deferred prosecution agreement is approved.

U.S. District Court for the NMI Chief Judge Ramona V. Manglona approved the agreement on Friday. As part of the deal, the judge will hold the case against Blyth in abeyance for up to 18 months.

If he meets all the conditions of the agreement, the U.S. government would drop all charges against him.

The information was filed in court on Feb. 7. Manglona unsealed the information on Feb. 10.
The information charged Blyth with conspiracy to cause a financial institution to fail to file a currency transaction report, causing a financial institution to fail to file a suspicious activity report, and failure to maintain an effective anti-money laundering program; aiding and abetting.

The indictment, which was filed on May 9, 2013, charged Blyth, Hong Kong Entertainment (Overseas) Investments, Ltd., which owns Tinian Dynasty; and VIP services manager George Que with one count of conspiracy to cause a financial institution to fail to file a currency transaction report and nine counts of causing a financial institution to fail to file a currency transaction
The defendants allegedly conspired to allow gamblers to conduct transactions involving more than $10,000 without filing with the U.S. government the required paperwork, called Currency Transaction Reports, from September 2009 to the present.

Federal law requires that a CTR be filed with the Internal Revenue Service by financial institutions, including casinos, for any cash transaction over $10,000.

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