EIS describes independent water systems for the military’s needs

At maximum demand, the U.S. military could pump 482,339 gallons of potable water per day with their proposed three to six new supply wells on Tinian.

The proposed potable water demand is detailed in the CNMI joint-live fire training draft environmental impact statement. The EIS describes three to six new supply wells with one backup to the north and east of the Tinian airport to support the training and operations.

Under Tinian Alternative 1, “the operation and maintenance of this new system, including supply, transmission and distribution would be independent of the Commonwealth Utilities Corp.,” which manages and owns the water system on Tinian.

Right now, CUC’s system consists of one supply well, three storage tanks, a chlorine treatment system, distribution piping, water meters, and other support facilities.

But this system, according to the EIS, has “substantial leaks” due to old piping, overflows at storage tanks, and leaks due to high water pressure.

The large water losses result in significantly more water being pumped from the well to make up for the losses in the system, the EIS notes.

For their proposed base camp and munitions storage area, the military would require an average of 240,013 gallons per day. This camp and storage area is located in the military lease area north of the Tinian airport.

At their proposed facilities at the Port Tinian, which is outside their lease area, the military would have an average demand of 22,181 gallons per day, for a total Tinian demand of 262,194 gallons per day.

Their maximum total demand would be 482,339 gallons of water per day. Some 459,758 gallons would come from the base camp and munitions storage area.

This total water demand is almost identical to their other training alternatives, the EIS notes.

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Dennis B. Chan | Reporter
Dennis Chan covers education, environment, utilities, and air and seaport issues in the CNMI. He graduated with a degree in English Literature from the University of Guam. Contact him at dennis_chan@saipantribune.com.

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