2 inmates ask for protective order vs some law enforcers

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Two federal inmates have asked for protective orders from the U.S. District Court for the NMI against law enforcers in various agencies, afraid that these law enforcers might retaliate against them.

Edwin P. Blas and Francisco N. Basa, who are serving prison time in Guam, have asked the District Court for the NMI for a protective order in case of potential retaliation from defendants they named in their lawsuit for allegedly violating their constitutional rights.

Blas and Basa both submitted handwritten complaints naming U.S Marshals Service Saipan’s Don Hall and Alfred Celis, CNMI Department of Corrections officials Georgia Cabrera, Jose K. Pangelinan, Maria Aldan, Raymond Mafnas, Vince Attao, an unnamed senator, and an unnamed food service contractor as defendants.

The inmates stated in their complaint that because they’re housed in a correctional facility, they are more vulnerable to harm in the hands of the defendants—either mentally, emotionally or physically.

“They have access to our medications, food that is served by a catering contractor, and access to our cell rooms at all times,” they wrote.

Basa and Blas accused the U.S. Marshals of having a history of retaliations against prisoners in the Federal Bureau of Prisons.

Basa and Blas are also accusing the defendants of violating their rights and privileges under the U.S. Constitution.

Basa and Blas are suing the defendants for alleged negligence and intentional infliction of emotional distress. The lawsuit alleged violations of the plaintiffs’ First, Fifth, Eighth, and 14th amendment rights, and is demanding damages. Additionally, Basa and Blas also want to be allowed to complete their prison sentences on Saipan.

According to the two, the defendants have deprived them of access to a law library and voluntary religious programs. They also said that they do not have access to adequate health care and proper institution conditions. They said they have no adequate participation in education, vocational training, and employment programs. They said they were also deprived of nutritious meals, and provided no opportunities to open a bank and or savings account to assist their families financially.

Basa was sentenced to four years and six months in prison in 2006 for conspiracy to distribute 50 grams of methamphetamine. Blas was imprisoned after violating his probation when he punched his wife while he was drunk.

Kimberly Bautista | Reporter
Kimberly Albiso Bautista has covered a wide range of news beats, including the community, housing, crime, and more. She now covers sports for the Saipan Tribune. Contact her at kimberly_bautista@saipantribune.com.
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