The hustle culture

The whirlwind of change created by information-technology shows mankind’s desire to get things done quickly through the best use of technology. It’s a powerful revolution that is here to stay.

For instance, I’ve gone from reading good old reliable hard copy of the newspaper to a click. I instantly access online newspapers and other materials from all over. Tons of instant information! Then there’s email.

Modern technology has also turned up the heat in geopolitical contest between our country and China. Other than the ongoing trade war, it has shifted to technology or who has the most powerful hi-tech device and weaponry.

I see daily use of IT devices, e.g., smartphones, tablets, laptops, etc., among our young people who know how to work the device like it’s the back of their hand. I marvel at their ability to text and talk, simultaneously. Even the older folks are into the hustle for instant information.

Children are good examples how IT took their time from normal family relationships to alienation. Individual time now focuses on a smartphone, tablet, laptop and other hi-tech devices. It has created what someone called the “hustle culture.”

There’s the wall of silence that becomes more noticeable as each sinks into his device all on his own. Not against hi-tech devices but I find it concerning how it could adversely affect real-time relationships at home.

Before the advent of IT, you do recall spending time with family talking, especially around dinnertime. Or doing something constructive together as a family. It’s almost non-existent today. Or am I being precipitous or is there simply an epidemic of NMI-wide intellectual menopause?

A click: The digital miracle delivers real news and fake news, information, misinformation and disinformation at the speed of a click, creating a jumble of confusion for understanding, and perception, according to Susan Fields, columnist for the Washington Times.

She related, “Malevolent offshoots suggest addiction for young people growing up in the high-tech society, changing manners and mores in their modes of communication, and in their relationships, too. The consequence is a new kind of loneliness for the isolated data collector searching for photographs and responses to the latest apps.”

She added, “Adults, too, become dependent not only on the information, but on the delivery of it, hooked on the search for greater speed to spread ‘the latest’ into a telephone, notebook or computer. With constant bombardment of personal and public ‘inputs,’ it’s harder to make distinctions as to what’s important and significant.”

It’s the newly minted “hustle culture,” an issue that mom and dad should visit and reset to bring the team back into the family unit by talking with one another via normal conversations. Social media plays a role in all the confusion, misinformation and disinformation. It’s up to you to determine which news source is credible and reliable.

Poverty: The quality of life for 15,000 employees earning poverty income persistently creates hardship for affected families. It may be an unpleasant issue for politicos but ignoring its resolution only prolongs the miseries of hardship families must endure from persistent negligence.

You did superbly well employing negligence, now come back and resolve it in sterling fashion too, sayu? Shall we hear real solution, anybody? Or do we have to harp louder?

Admittedly, the issue is a task in itself from A-Z, especially its resolution. How do you resolve it to bring decency to these families? What’s the realistic answer on this score and is it attainable? Where do we begin? Isn’t it your fiduciary to resolve the much-aspired quality of life among villagers you represent?

It’s time to realistically study the issue with hope of resolving it in the interest of families hit heavily with mind-numbing insufficient family income. It’s unconscionable to perpetuate a situation you could resolve employing due diligence.

Homework: There’s a claim of improvements in the local economy. To what extent has this benefited the 15,000 employees still earning poverty income at this point in time?

Quizzical that we seem somnolent or sleepy, heightening curiosity why was this issue skipped? Is it the realization of an impending heavy economic contraction that quietly but steadily heads south as we speak?

A prudent plan is in order to ensure that two basic areas are funded squarely: health and education. The rest may have to do without the luxury of extras given the current economic contraction.

John S. Del Rosario Jr. | Contributing Author
John DelRosario Jr. is a former publisher of the Saipan Tribune and a former secretary of the Department of Public Lands.
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